Model & Entrepreneur, Tisha George

The road to independence as an entrepreneur away from a 9 to 5 job is littered with beautiful mistakes that are critical to growth. The hardest part is not starting or maintaining a business. It’s making the decision to go for it. A regular job, no matter what the hours, gives us a level of security and comfort that being an entrepreneur doesn’t have. Everything depends on you getting up every day and making things happen, no matter what transpired the day before. From time to time, we love to highlight entrepreneurs worldwide who’ve taken that brave step, and with determination, never looked back.

We’ve contacted Tisha George, from across the pond for an interview because she’s a great example of someone who has taken the leap of faith and started her own product line of cosmetics.

She’s a full-time model, owner of TC GlitzGlam, and mother of two who decided to listen to the small voice inside that told her to follow her dream of independence. We contacted Tish to find out about her journey thus far and how her business has changed her life.

What motivated you into becoming an entrepreneur?

I have always known I wanted to be my own boss and being a single mum of two boys I knew only I could make it happen. It was important for our stability and my sanity!

What did you find difficult about getting started?

As I had no previous business experience, I researched everything I had to know to get started, and I learned as I went along. You make a few mistakes but you learn from each and every one of them and move forward.

There are 3 main stumbling blocks for entrepreneurs: funding, partnerships, and motivation. Which one was lacking or the most challenging for you?

The funding. I find as the situation I was in, that was what was most lacking I also struggled with partnerships until I let go of the fear of approaching like-minded others, after all, they’re no different than me.

Looking back, how much do you believe your success is owed to luck and how much is due to hard work, percentage-wise?

I would say 90% hard work and 10% luck.

Aren’t you afraid of the competition in your field?

No, because the only competition you should be in is one with yourself. If I sat around thinking about who I’m competing with, I might not have started at all. It’s good to see what’s out there but not put yourself in a position where you are stifled by what you see others doing.

Was there anything in your childhood that motivated you to do what you are doing now?

As a child I was always dancing and singing and loved makeup and beauty it’s what made me feel fulfilled and full of happiness.

Who did you idol growing up? It can be an artist, sportsperson, or someone in the business.

I was obsessed with Britney Spears but I had many others who I looked up to due to them being fun.

When did you realize you hit your stride? In other words, when did you become comfortable with what you were doing?

At the start of this year, my confidence has just skyrocketed as I’ve been really learning and improving my self-love!

What differences are you making in the business? Affordability, streamlining, or legacy?

I am building a solid foundation for the legacy of my family. And hopefully inspiring others to do the same and showing them that dreams can really come true. Very few people have the confidence to realize their dream of becoming a worldwide beauty brand. I want to show that you can do it and change your life.

Would you rather be bigger or faster in your profession?

I’d rather become bigger at the pace I’m working at now because that is where true growth is realized. If you rush too fast I feel that it will crumble just as fast.

Everyone feels like giving up at some point to find a “regular job”. What kept you going when you hit that wall and what did the wall look like?

I knew I couldn’t work for anyone else. I had to harness my creativity and talents in order to be my own boss. I cannot give up because my life and the lives of my sons depend on it. You will always run into obstacles and feel like you have reached a dead end, but there is always a way. I know my worth.

Armand Lucas
Armand Lucas

Journalist and editor for NY Style and several other magazines and websites. Currently working on a book about the Quebecois in Canada and how the culture is related to Cajun Louisiana.