Why Quebec City is considered the most romantic city in North America

Yes! It is the most romantic city in North America! Quebec City, located in the mostly French-speaking province of Quebec in Canada, is usually reserved for the seasoned North American traveler.

Once you reach Quebec city, you’ll see why it’s considered the most European city in North America. Direct flights are usually just $87 for round-trip airfare from NYC but if you choose to drive, expect an 8-hour trip through some of the most beautiful country roads with vineyards and sheep farms waiting for you.

Most of the inhabitants are bilingual and will greet you in the shops with a “Hello, Bonjour”, to let you know that they can converse with you in English or in French.

Quebec City is beautiful and chock full of events during winter and summer. Since most of the old part of the city hasn’t changed much in centuries, you’ll feel as if you were transported unto a movie set of the most romantic French movie in this 400-year-old city of love.

The impressive Château Frontenac is Québec City’s most famous landmark. The luxurious hotel perched atop Cape Diamond since the late 19th century was designed to convey prestige in keeping with its Old
Québec surroundings. Historic events have taken place in the building, and famous heads of state, royalty, and famous Americans and international actors have stayed there.

Fairmont Le Château Frontenac can be seen in the background of this picture of one of the many streets of the old city of Quebec.
The hotel overlooks most of the city and room prices start at $153 a night.

With its French and British-style architecture, fortifications, stone buildings, and narrow cobblestone streets, Old Québec is a historic area that’s been recognized by UNESCO since 1985. During the summer, some of its streets are closed to car traffic on weekends, allowing pedestrians to take up all the space and enjoy the festive atmosphere of the terrace restaurants.

Poutine is Quebec City’s most traditional dish.

Québec is a culinary treasure rich in history and flavor. Even though poutine is Québec’s most famous food, the success of Québécois cuisine stems from its heirloom recipes and regional specialties. Besides the authentic sugar shacks, try Buffet de l’Antiquaire, which is a staple of traditional French-Canadian cuisine in Québec City that sticks to traditions, one local ingredient at a time.

See and read more about Quebec’s Old City in our latest free issue.

Armand Lucas
Armand Lucas

Journalist and editor for NY Style and several other magazines and websites. Currently working on a book about the Quebecois in Canada and how the culture is related to Cajun Louisiana.